The hotel video guide for booking the best deals online - TVtrip

Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum (United States)

  • Overview
  • Hotels
  • Map
  • Photos
loader
illustration

Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum - {CATEGORY}

The Coliseum was commissioned in 1921 as a memorial to veterans of World War I (rededicated to veterans of all wars in 1968). The official ground breaking ceremony took place on December 21, 1921 with work being completed in just over 16 months, on May 1, 1923. Designed by John and Donald Parkinson, the original bowl's initial construction costs were $954,873. When the Coliseum opened in 1923, it was the largest stadium in Los Angeles with a capacity of 75,144. In 1930, however, with the Olympics due in two years, the stadium was extended upward to seventy-nine rows with two tiers of tunnels, expanding the seating to 101,574. The now-signature torch was added. For a time it was known as Olympic Stadium. The Olympic cauldron torch which burned through both Games remains above the peristyle at the east end of the stadium as a reminder of this, as do the Olympic rings symbols over one of the main entrances. The football field runs east to west (a relative rarity in American football stadiums) with the press box on the south side of the stadium. The scoreboard and video screen that tower over the peristyle date back to 1983; they replaced a smaller scoreboard installed in 1972, which in turn supplanted the 1937 model, one of the first all-electric scoreboards in the nation. Over the years new light towers have been placed along the north and south rims. Over a period in the middle 1950s the press box was renovated and the large analog clock and thermometer over the office windows at either end of the peristyle were added. So too were the "Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum" lettering and Olympic rings, lighted at night, on the eastern face of the peristyle tower. Between the double peristyle arches at the east end is the Coliseum's "Court of Honor"-- plaques recognizing many of the memorable events and participants in Coliseum history, including a full list of 1932 and 1984 Olympic gold medalists. (The complete roster of honorees can be seen below). A pair of life-sized bronze nude statues of male and female athletes atop a 20,000 pound (9,000 kg) post-and-lintel frame formed the Olympic Gateway created by Robert Graham for the 1984 games. The statues, modeled on water polo player Terry Schroeder and long jumper from Guyana, Jennifer Innis, who participated in the games, were noted for their anatomical accuracy. A decorative facade bearing the Olympic rings was erected in front of the peristyle for the 1984 games, and the structure remained in place through that year's football season. For many years the Coliseum was capable of seating over 100,000 spectators. In 1964 the stadium underwent its first major renovation in over three decades. Much of the original green wood-and-metal bench seating was replaced by individual theater-type chairs in dark red and beige colors, which are still in place today. The seating capacity was reduced to approximately 93,000. And from this point to the late 1970s it was common practice to shift the playing field to the closed end of the stadium and install end zone bleachers in front of the peristyle, limiting further the number of seats available for sale. For USC-UCLA and USC-University of Notre Dame games, which often attracted crowds upward of 90,000, the bleachers were pushed back and field was re-marked in its original position. When a larger east grandstand was installed in 1977-1978 at the behest of Rams owner Carroll Rosenbloom, the capacity was just 71,500. With the upcoming 1984 Summer Olympic Games, a new track was installed and the playing field permanently placed inside it. The Olympic-era seating capacity of approximately 91,500 made the venue problematic for the Raiders, as it meant that the vast majority of their home games could not be televised locally due to NFL "blackout" rules (league rules do not allow home games to be televised locally unless the game sells out at least 72 hours prior to its scheduled kickoff). Furthermore, the combination of the stadium's large, relatively shallow design, along with the presence of the track between the playing field and the stands, meant that some of the original end zone seats were essentially away from the field by the equivalent length of another football field. To address these and other problems, the Coliseum underwent a $15 million renovation before the 1993 football season.

Practical Information

Address: 3911 South Figueroa Street, Los Angeles, California 90037

Country: United States

Capacity: 93607

Surface: Grass

Dimensions: 105 x 70 m

Record Attendance: 115 300

Tenants: USC Trojans

Operator: Los Angeles Coliseum Commission

Opened: 1923

Architect(s): John, Donald Parkinson

Hotels nearby

867 yd - Radisson Los Angeles Midtown At Usc

The Radisson Hotel Los Angeles Downtown at USC is located in Los Angeles, Calif. Across the street from the University of Southern California Two blocks from Shrine Auditorium Hotel Features. HeatedRead more outdoor pool and spa tub Complimentary high speed Internet access Restaurant and bar Complimentary high speed Internet access Cable television Hide

1,503 yd - Vagabond Inn Los Angeles at USC

With its central location, Vagabond Inn Los Angeles Hotel is within easy reach of most tourist attractions and business addresses in Los Angeles (CA). The Vagabond Inn Los Angeles Hotel boasts a conveRead morenient location with modern amenities in every guestroom and superb service. With elegant facilities and hospitality, guests at this hotel will surely have an impressive stay. To proceed with your reservation at the Vagabond Inn Los Angeles Hotel via our secure online booking form, please enter your period of stay.Hide

1.3 mi - Americas Best Value Inn and Suites Los Angeles Downtown/SW

16 minutes by car distance from the center, this hotel is located at 4122 S Western Avenue, in the south-west section of Los Angeles, which is ideal to discover the city.The Americas Best Value Inn anRead mored Suites Los Angeles Downtown/SW has 41 rooms. Prices start at 87 US Dollars for the average room although all room categories are represented from Room to the Room rooms.Of a Budget category, the Americas Best Value Inn and Suites Los Angeles Downtown/SW has all the comforts such as : n.a..It is part of the hotel chain BV.For those going to the airport, Los Angeles is 7 miles from the hotel which is about 24 minutes by car.Hide

1.3 mi - Golden West Manor Motel

Golden West Manor Motel. Hotel "Golden West Manor Motel" has acquired 2 stars. This hotel is a perfect pied-a-terre from which to discover Los Angeles. The temperature of the bedrooms is never too hotRead more thanks to the relieving air conditioning. The facilities include a gym where visitors can get in some training. Staying connected with family and friends is made possible with the free of charge Internet access that is provided.Hide

1.9 mi - SandPiper Motel - Los Angeles

SandPiper Motel Los Angeles. "SandPiper Motel Los Angeles" has received 1 star. This accommodation is a convenient base point from which you can explore Los Angeles. There is a gymnasium where you havRead moree the option to exercise on your own. Of course, there is free Internet access available.Hide

Customer reviews

More info

Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum - {CATEGORY}

The Coliseum was commissioned in 1921 as a memorial to veterans of World War I (rededicated to veterans of all wars in 1968). The official ground breaking ceremony took place on December 21, 1921 with work being completed in just over 16 months, on May 1, 1923. Designed by John and Donald Parkinson, the original bowl's initial construction costs were $954,873. When the Coliseum opened in 1923, it was the largest stadium in Los Angeles with a capacity of 75,144. In 1930, however, with the Olympics due in two years, the stadium was extended upward to seventy-nine rows with two tiers of tunnels, expanding the seating to 101,574. The now-signature torch was added. For a time it was known as Olympic Stadium. The Olympic cauldron torch which burned through both Games remains above the peristyle at the east end of the stadium as a reminder of this, as do the Olympic rings symbols over one of the main entrances. The football field runs east to west (a relative rarity in American football stadiums) with the press box on the south side of the stadium. The scoreboard and video screen that tower over the peristyle date back to 1983; they replaced a smaller scoreboard installed in 1972, which in turn supplanted the 1937 model, one of the first all-electric scoreboards in the nation. Over the years new light towers have been placed along the north and south rims. Over a period in the middle 1950s the press box was renovated and the large analog clock and thermometer over the office windows at either end of the peristyle were added. So too were the "Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum" lettering and Olympic rings, lighted at night, on the eastern face of the peristyle tower. Between the double peristyle arches at the east end is the Coliseum's "Court of Honor"-- plaques recognizing many of the memorable events and participants in Coliseum history, including a full list of 1932 and 1984 Olympic gold medalists. (The complete roster of honorees can be seen below). A pair of life-sized bronze nude statues of male and female athletes atop a 20,000 pound (9,000 kg) post-and-lintel frame formed the Olympic Gateway created by Robert Graham for the 1984 games. The statues, modeled on water polo player Terry Schroeder and long jumper from Guyana, Jennifer Innis, who participated in the games, were noted for their anatomical accuracy. A decorative facade bearing the Olympic rings was erected in front of the peristyle for the 1984 games, and the structure remained in place through that year's football season. For many years the Coliseum was capable of seating over 100,000 spectators. In 1964 the stadium underwent its first major renovation in over three decades. Much of the original green wood-and-metal bench seating was replaced by individual theater-type chairs in dark red and beige colors, which are still in place today. The seating capacity was reduced to approximately 93,000. And from this point to the late 1970s it was common practice to shift the playing field to the closed end of the stadium and install end zone bleachers in front of the peristyle, limiting further the number of seats available for sale. For USC-UCLA and USC-University of Notre Dame games, which often attracted crowds upward of 90,000, the bleachers were pushed back and field was re-marked in its original position. When a larger east grandstand was installed in 1977-1978 at the behest of Rams owner Carroll Rosenbloom, the capacity was just 71,500. With the upcoming 1984 Summer Olympic Games, a new track was installed and the playing field permanently placed inside it. The Olympic-era seating capacity of approximately 91,500 made the venue problematic for the Raiders, as it meant that the vast majority of their home games could not be televised locally due to NFL "blackout" rules (league rules do not allow home games to be televised locally unless the game sells out at least 72 hours prior to its scheduled kickoff). Furthermore, the combination of the stadium's large, relatively shallow design, along with the presence of the track between the playing field and the stands, meant that some of the original end zone seats were essentially away from the field by the equivalent length of another football field. To address these and other problems, the Coliseum underwent a $15 million renovation before the 1993 football season.

Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum - {CATEGORY}

The Coliseum was commissioned in 1921 as a memorial to veterans of World War I (rededicated to veterans of all wars in 1968). The official ground breaking ceremony took place on December 21, 1921 with work being completed in just over 16 months, on May 1, 1923. Designed by John and Donald Parkinson, the original bowl's initial construction costs were $954,873. When the Coliseum opened in 1923, it was the largest stadium in Los Angeles with a capacity of 75,144. In 1930, however, with the Olympics due in two years, the stadium was extended upward to seventy-nine rows with two tiers of tunnels, expanding the seating to 101,574. The now-signature torch was added. For a time it was known as Olympic Stadium. The Olympic cauldron torch which burned through both Games remains above the peristyle at the east end of the stadium as a reminder of this, as do the Olympic rings symbols over one of the main entrances. The football field runs east to west (a relative rarity in American football stadiums) with the press box on the south side of the stadium. The scoreboard and video screen that tower over the peristyle date back to 1983; they replaced a smaller scoreboard installed in 1972, which in turn supplanted the 1937 model, one of the first all-electric scoreboards in the nation. Over the years new light towers have been placed along the north and south rims. Over a period in the middle 1950s the press box was renovated and the large analog clock and thermometer over the office windows at either end of the peristyle were added. So too were the "Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum" lettering and Olympic rings, lighted at night, on the eastern face of the peristyle tower. Between the double peristyle arches at the east end is the Coliseum's "Court of Honor"-- plaques recognizing many of the memorable events and participants in Coliseum history, including a full list of 1932 and 1984 Olympic gold medalists. (The complete roster of honorees can be seen below). A pair of life-sized bronze nude statues of male and female athletes atop a 20,000 pound (9,000 kg) post-and-lintel frame formed the Olympic Gateway created by Robert Graham for the 1984 games. The statues, modeled on water polo player Terry Schroeder and long jumper from Guyana, Jennifer Innis, who participated in the games, were noted for their anatomical accuracy. A decorative facade bearing the Olympic rings was erected in front of the peristyle for the 1984 games, and the structure remained in place through that year's football season. For many years the Coliseum was capable of seating over 100,000 spectators. In 1964 the stadium underwent its first major renovation in over three decades. Much of the original green wood-and-metal bench seating was replaced by individual theater-type chairs in dark red and beige colors, which are still in place today. The seating capacity was reduced to approximately 93,000. And from this point to the late 1970s it was common practice to shift the playing field to the closed end of the stadium and install end zone bleachers in front of the peristyle, limiting further the number of seats available for sale. For USC-UCLA and USC-University of Notre Dame games, which often attracted crowds upward of 90,000, the bleachers were pushed back and field was re-marked in its original position. When a larger east grandstand was installed in 1977-1978 at the behest of Rams owner Carroll Rosenbloom, the capacity was just 71,500. With the upcoming 1984 Summer Olympic Games, a new track was installed and the playing field permanently placed inside it. The Olympic-era seating capacity of approximately 91,500 made the venue problematic for the Raiders, as it meant that the vast majority of their home games could not be televised locally due to NFL "blackout" rules (league rules do not allow home games to be televised locally unless the game sells out at least 72 hours prior to its scheduled kickoff). Furthermore, the combination of the stadium's large, relatively shallow design, along with the presence of the track between the playing field and the stands, meant that some of the original end zone seats were essentially away from the field by the equivalent length of another football field. To address these and other problems, the Coliseum underwent a $15 million renovation before the 1993 football season.

International Sites

dansk | deutsch | ελληνικά | english | english | español | suomi | français | magyar | italiano | 日本語 | 한국어 | nederlands | norsk | polski | português | română | русский | српски | svenska | 中文 | 中文

International Sites

| | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | |

Why use TVtrip?

  • Best Rates

    Thanks to our booking partners you can access the rates on the web

  • Quality

    All videos are filmed by professionals

  • Maximum choice

    Choose over 35,884 video to help you make the right choice

  • Transparency

    Unbiased, professional videos to help you choose the right hotel

  • We speak your language

    TVtrip is currently in 22 languages

Informations

Terms of Use | Privacy Policy | About | Team | Press | Help | Contact Us

* Best min. prices over next 30 days and among our hotel booking partners.
The displayed amount is indicative and based on today’s exchange rate.

More info on filming your hotel?

© 2019 - TVtrip.com

Key