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Les Invalides (France)

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Les Invalides, {CATEGORY}

This vast complex was founded in 1675, at Louis XIV's request, to take in French ex-servicemen and handicapped war veterans - from whom it gets its name, "Invalides." It was the first French hospital-turned-home to be built entirely for soldiers. The building is adorned with a pretty classical façade, a delightful little garden, a large courtyard and an impressive esplanade. As well as the hospital - in which a hundred or so disabled ex-servicemen are still cared for - the complex also houses the eglise du Dôme , Saint-Louis des Invalides , the Musee de l'Armee , the Musee de l'Ordre de la Liberation and the Musee des Plans-Relief .

Practical Information

Address: 129 rue de Grenelle, Paris 75007

City: Paris

Country: France

Phone 1: +33 (0) 1 44 42 37 72

Email: visites-ma@invalides.org

Official site: www.invalides.org

Opening hours: Oct-Mar daily 10am-5pm (5:30pm on Sun). Apr-Sept daily 10am-6pm (6:30pm on Sun). Jul-Aug daily 10am-6:45pm (Napoleon's Tomb only)

Exceptionally closed: Closed on January 1st, May 1st, November 1, and December 25th

Entrance fee: Admission to Musée de l'Armée, Napoléon's Tomb, and Musée des Plans-Reliefs 8.50€ adults, 6.50€ students, free for children 17 and younger

Access by subway: Latour-Maubourg, Varenne, Invalides, St-Francois-Xavier

Hotels nearby

127 yd - Hôtel de Latour Maubourg

Hotel de Latour Maubourg is a popular choice amongst travelers in Paris, whether exploring or just passing through. The hotel offers guests a range of services and amenities designed to provide comforRead moret and convenience. All the necessary facilities, including laundry service/dry cleaning, pets allowed, elevator, airport transfer, 24hr room service, are at hand. Guestrooms are designed to provide an optimal level of comfort with welcoming decor and convenient amenities like mini bar, air conditioning, television LCD/plasma screen, satellite/cable TV, internet access – wireless (complimentary). To enhance guests' stay, the hotel offers recreational facilities such as sauna. Discover all Paris has to offer by making Hotel de Latour Maubourg your base.Hide

192 yd - Best Western Tour Eiffel Invalides

The 3-star Best Western Tour Eiffel Invalides Hotel offers comfort and convinience whether you're on business or holiday in Paris. The hotel offers a wide range of amenities and perks to ensure you haRead moreve a great time. 24hr room service, business center, bar/pub, concierge, laundry service/dry cleaning are just some of the facilities on offer. The well-appointed guestrooms feature shower, complimentary bottled water, desk, air conditioning, in room safe. Entertain the hotel's recreational facilities, including garden. No matter what your reasons are for visiting Paris, Best Western Tour Eiffel Invalides Hotel will make you feel instantly at home.Hide

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254 yd - Le Pavillon

Hotel Le Pavillon is perfectly located for both business and leisure guests in Paris. Both business travelers and tourists can enjoy the hotel's facilities and services. Service-minded staff will welcRead moreome and guide you at the Hotel Le Pavillon. The well-appointed guestrooms feature air conditioning, in room safe, television, shower, desk. The hotel's peaceful atmosphere extends to its recreational facilities which include garden. Hotel Le Pavillon combines warm hospitality with a lovely ambiance to make your stay in Paris unforgettable.Hide

302 yd - Hotel de L'Empereur

Located in 07. Tour Eiffel - Invalides, Hotel De l'Empereur Paris is a perfect starting point from which to explore Paris. The hotel has everything you need for a comfortable stay. Facilities like conRead morecierge, tours, safety deposit boxes, Wi-Fi in public areas, business center are readily available for you to enjoy. Non smoking rooms, shower, hair dryer, air conditioning, internet access – wireless (complimentary) can be found in each guestroom. The hotel offers various recreational opportunities. Convenience and comfort makes Hotel De l'Empereur Paris the perfect choice for your stay in Paris.Hide

303 yd - Hôtel Thoumieux

Hotel Thoumieux is perfectly located for both business and leisure guests in Paris. Both business travelers and tourists can enjoy the hotel's facilities and services. Disabled facilities, pets alloweRead mored, concierge, meeting facilities, safety deposit boxes are just some of the facilities on offer. Each guestroom is elegantly furnished and equipped with handy amenities. Access to the hotel's garden will further enhance your satisfying stay. Hotel Thoumieux combines warm hospitality with a lovely ambiance to make your stay in Paris unforgettable.Hide

Customer reviews

More info

Les Invalides, {CATEGORY}

In 1670, the Sun King decided to build this "hotel" to house soldiers with disabilities. It wasn't an entirely benevolent gesture, considering that the men had been injured, crippled, or blinded while fighting his battles. When the building was finally completed (Louis XIV had long been dead), a gilded dome by Jules Hardouin-Mansart crowned it, and its corridors stretched for miles. The best way to approach the Invalides is by crossing over the Right Bank via the early-1900s pont Alexander-III and entering the cobblestone forecourt, where a display of massive cannons makes a formidable welcome. Before rushing on to Napoleon's Tomb, you may want to visit the world's greatest military museum, the Musée de l'Armée. In 1794, a French inspector started collecting weapons, uniforms, and equipment, and with the accumulation of war material over time, the museum has become a documentary of man's self-destruction. Viking swords, Burgundian battle axes, 14th-century blunderbusses, Balkan khandjars, American Browning machine guns, war pitchforks, salamander-engraved Renaissance serpentines, a 1528 Griffon, musketoons, grenadiers . . . if it can kill, it's enshrined here. As a sardonic touch, there's even the wooden leg of General Daumesnil, the governor of Vincennes who lost his leg in the battle of Wagram. Oblivious to the irony of committing a crime against a place that documents man's evil nature, the Nazis looted the museum in 1940. Among the outstanding acquisitions are suits of armor worn by the kings and dignitaries of France, including Louis XIV. The best are in the new Arsenal. The most famous one, the "armor suit of the lion", was made for François I. Henri II ordered his suit engraved with the monogram of his mistress, Diane de Poitiers, and (perhaps reluctantly) that of his wife, Catherine de Médicis. Particularly fine are the showcases of swords and the World War I mementos, including those of American and Canadian soldiers - seek out the Armistice Bugle, which sounded the cease-fire on November 7, 1918, before the general cease-fire on November 11. The west wing's Salle Orientale has arms of the Eastern world, including Asia and the Mideast Muslim countries, from the 16th century to the 19th century. Turkish armor (look for Bajazet's helmet) and weaponry, and Chinese and Japanese armor and swords are on display. Then there's that little Corsican who became France's greatest soldier. Here you can see the death mask Antommarchi made of him, as well as an oil by Delaroche painted at the time of Napoleon's first banishment (Apr 1814) and depicting him as he probably looked, paunch and all. The First Empire exhibit displays Napoleon's field bed with his tent, in the room devoted to the Restoration, the 100 Days, and Waterloo, you can see his bedroom as it was at the time of his death on St. Helena. The Turenne Salon contains other souvenirs, such as the hat Napoleon wore at Eylau, the sword from his Austerlitz victory, and his "Flag of Farewell", which he kissed before departing for Elba. You can gain access to the Musée des Plans-Reliefs through the west wing. This collection shows French towns and monuments done in scale models (the model of Strasbourg fills an entire room), as well as models of military fortifications since the days of the great Vauban. A walk across the Cour d'Honneur (Court of Honor) delivers you to the Eglise du Dôme, designed by Hardouin-Mansart for Louis XIV. The architect began work on the church in 1677, though he died before its completion. The dome is the second-tallest monument in Paris (the Tour Eiffel is the tallest, of course). The hearse used at the emperor's funeral on May 9, 1821, is in the Napoleon Chapel. To accommodate Napoleon's Tomb, the architect Visconti had to redesign the church's high altar in 1842. First buried on St. Helena, Napoleon's remains were exhumed and brought to Paris in 1840 on the orders of Louis-Philippe, who demanded that the English return the emperor to French soil. The remains were locked inside six coffins in this tomb made of red Finnish porphyry, with a green granite base. Surrounding it are a dozen Amazon-like figures representing Napoleon's victories. Almost lampooning the smallness of the man, everything is done on a gargantuan scale. In his coronation robes, the statue of Napoleon stands 2.5m (8 1/4 ft). high. The grave of the "King of Rome", his son by second wife Marie-Louise, lies at his feet. Surrounding Napoleon's Tomb are those of his brother, Joseph Bonaparte, the great Vauban, who built many of France's fortifications, World War I Allied commander Foch, and the vicomte de Turenne, the republic's first grenadier (actually, only his heart is entombed here).

Les Invalides, {CATEGORY}

In 1670, the Sun King decided to build this "hotel" to house soldiers with disabilities. It wasn't an entirely benevolent gesture, considering that the men had been injured, crippled, or blinded while fighting his battles. When the building was finally completed (Louis XIV had long been dead), a gilded dome by Jules Hardouin-Mansart crowned it, and its corridors stretched for miles. The best way to approach the Invalides is by crossing over the Right Bank via the early-1900s pont Alexander-III and entering the cobblestone forecourt, where a display of massive cannons makes a formidable welcome. Before rushing on to Napoleon's Tomb, you may want to visit the world's greatest military museum, the Musée de l'Armée. In 1794, a French inspector started collecting weapons, uniforms, and equipment, and with the accumulation of war material over time, the museum has become a documentary of man's self-destruction. Viking swords, Burgundian battle axes, 14th-century blunderbusses, Balkan khandjars, American Browning machine guns, war pitchforks, salamander-engraved Renaissance serpentines, a 1528 Griffon, musketoons, grenadiers . . . if it can kill, it's enshrined here. As a sardonic touch, there's even the wooden leg of General Daumesnil, the governor of Vincennes who lost his leg in the battle of Wagram. Oblivious to the irony of committing a crime against a place that documents man's evil nature, the Nazis looted the museum in 1940. Among the outstanding acquisitions are suits of armor worn by the kings and dignitaries of France, including Louis XIV. The best are in the new Arsenal. The most famous one, the "armor suit of the lion", was made for François I. Henri II ordered his suit engraved with the monogram of his mistress, Diane de Poitiers, and (perhaps reluctantly) that of his wife, Catherine de Médicis. Particularly fine are the showcases of swords and the World War I mementos, including those of American and Canadian soldiers - seek out the Armistice Bugle, which sounded the cease-fire on November 7, 1918, before the general cease-fire on November 11. The west wing's Salle Orientale has arms of the Eastern world, including Asia and the Mideast Muslim countries, from the 16th century to the 19th century. Turkish armor (look for Bajazet's helmet) and weaponry, and Chinese and Japanese armor and swords are on display. Then there's that little Corsican who became France's greatest soldier. Here you can see the death mask Antommarchi made of him, as well as an oil by Delaroche painted at the time of Napoleon's first banishment (Apr 1814) and depicting him as he probably looked, paunch and all. The First Empire exhibit displays Napoleon's field bed with his tent, in the room devoted to the Restoration, the 100 Days, and Waterloo, you can see his bedroom as it was at the time of his death on St. Helena. The Turenne Salon contains other souvenirs, such as the hat Napoleon wore at Eylau, the sword from his Austerlitz victory, and his "Flag of Farewell", which he kissed before departing for Elba. You can gain access to the Musée des Plans-Reliefs through the west wing. This collection shows French towns and monuments done in scale models (the model of Strasbourg fills an entire room), as well as models of military fortifications since the days of the great Vauban. A walk across the Cour d'Honneur (Court of Honor) delivers you to the Eglise du Dôme, designed by Hardouin-Mansart for Louis XIV. The architect began work on the church in 1677, though he died before its completion. The dome is the second-tallest monument in Paris (the Tour Eiffel is the tallest, of course). The hearse used at the emperor's funeral on May 9, 1821, is in the Napoleon Chapel. To accommodate Napoleon's Tomb, the architect Visconti had to redesign the church's high altar in 1842. First buried on St. Helena, Napoleon's remains were exhumed and brought to Paris in 1840 on the orders of Louis-Philippe, who demanded that the English return the emperor to French soil. The remains were locked inside six coffins in this tomb made of red Finnish porphyry, with a green granite base. Surrounding it are a dozen Amazon-like figures representing Napoleon's victories. Almost lampooning the smallness of the man, everything is done on a gargantuan scale. In his coronation robes, the statue of Napoleon stands 2.5m (8 1/4 ft). high. The grave of the "King of Rome", his son by second wife Marie-Louise, lies at his feet. Surrounding Napoleon's Tomb are those of his brother, Joseph Bonaparte, the great Vauban, who built many of France's fortifications, World War I Allied commander Foch, and the vicomte de Turenne, the republic's first grenadier (actually, only his heart is entombed here).

Les Invalides, {CATEGORY}

This vast complex was founded in 1675, at Louis XIV's request, to take in French ex-servicemen and handicapped war veterans - from whom it gets its name, "Invalides." It was the first French hospital-turned-home to be built entirely for soldiers. The building is adorned with a pretty classical façade, a delightful little garden, a large courtyard and an impressive esplanade. As well as the hospital - in which a hundred or so disabled ex-servicemen are still cared for - the complex also houses the eglise du Dôme , Saint-Louis des Invalides , the Musee de l'Armee , the Musee de l'Ordre de la Liberation and the Musee des Plans-Relief .

Les Invalides, {CATEGORY}

This vast complex was founded in 1675, at Louis XIV's request, to take in French ex-servicemen and handicapped war veterans - from whom it gets its name, "Invalides." It was the first French hospital-turned-home to be built entirely for soldiers. The building is adorned with a pretty classical façade, a delightful little garden, a large courtyard and an impressive esplanade. As well as the hospital - in which a hundred or so disabled ex-servicemen are still cared for - the complex also houses the eglise du Dôme , Saint-Louis des Invalides , the Musee de l'Armee , the Musee de l'Ordre de la Liberation and the Musee des Plans-Relief .

Activities nearby

> > > Les Invalides hotels near religious site: Les Invalides, Paris Les Invalides, Paris infos >

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