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Musée d'Orsay (France)

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Musée d'Orsay, {CATEGORY}

Nearly 2.5 million visitors each year come to see the largest collection in the world of impressionist artwork, found in the splendid Musee d'Orsay. The building itself, called the Gare d'Orsay, was built for the World's Fair of 1900. During World War II, it was used to welcome freed prisoners. Once the train station (the Gare) fell into disuse and the adjacent hotel closed down in 1973, the building was threatened with demolition. However, it was decided to instead transform the building's function to house a collection of art from the second half of the 19th Century. It was inaugurated in 1986 under the governance of François Mitterand. The principal gallery of the ground floor, 138 meters long (453 feet) and 32 meters tall (105 feet), is a reminder of the building's history. Among the masterpieces in this gallery are the scandalous Enterrement à Ornans by Gustave Courbet and the Glaneuses by Jean-François Millet. Fans of impressionism should head directly up to the fifth floor, where works by the greatest masters of this genre are hung in galleries 29 to 48. In order of appearance, these include La Classe de danse by Degas, Still Lifes by Manet such as L'Asperge, Le Bal du Moulin de la Galette by Renoir, and La Gare Saint-Lazare, La Cathedrale de Rouen or the Nympheas by Claude Monet. Works by Van Gogh in gallery 35 and Cezanne in 36 follow, the small galleries 37 and 38 contain pastels by Degas, and galleries 43-44 are devoted to Gauguin's paintings of Tahiti. Decorative arts are located a few flights down, worth visiting notably for the impressive collection of Art Nouveau. While on this floor, don't miss the terrasse Rodin, where L'Homme qui marche is located, and worth taking the time to appreciate. For a short rest to help absorb this astonishing collection, visit! the Cafe des Hauteurs on the third floor or the restaurant on the sixth floor. Also don't forget to check out the beautiful Hotel Le BelleChasse , which is walking distance from here. -Aurelie Pichard.

Practical Information

Address: 62 rue de Lille, Paris 75007

City: Paris

Country: France

Phone 1: +33 (0) 1 40 49 48 14

Official site: www.musee-orsay.fr

Opening hours: Tues-Wed and Fri-Sun 9:30am-6pm. Thurs 9:30am-9:45pm

Exceptionally closed: Closed on January 1st, May 1st, and December 25th

Entrance fee: Admission 8€ adults, 5.50€ ages 18-24, free ages 17 and younger

Access by subway: Solférino. RER Musée d'Orsay

Hotels nearby

76 yd - Bellechasse Saint-Germain

With its central location, Libertel Bellechasse Hotel is within easy reach of most tourist attractions and business addresses in Paris. This 3-star hotel offers 43 comfortable guestrooms with a range Read moreof in-room facilities suitable for the modern traveler. This Paris accommodation contains all of the facilities and conveniences you would expect from a hotel in its class. Modern comfort and convenience are seamlessly combined to ensure the guests' satisfaction. Please complete our secure online booking form by entering your period of stay.Hide

87 yd - Hotel Le Bellechasse

Stop at Hotel Le Bellechasse to discover the wonders of Paris. The hotel offers a wide range of amenities and perks to ensure you have a great time. All the necessary facilities, including room servicRead moree, pets allowed, bar/pub, elevator, business center, are at hand. Designed and decorated to make guests feel right at home, each room comes with internet access – wireless (complimentary), television, hair dryer, in room safe, satellite/cable TV. The hotel offers various recreational opportunities. For reliable service and professional staff, Hotel Le Bellechasse caters to your needs.Hide

193 yd - Hotel d'Orsay

Ideally located in the prime touristic area of 07. Tour Eiffel - Invalides, Hotel d'Orsay promises a relaxing and wonderful visit. The hotel offers a high standard of service and amenities to suit theRead more individual needs of all travelers. Room service, meeting facilities, safety deposit boxes, elevator, family room are on the list of things guests can enjoy. Relax in your comfortable guestroom, featuring internet access – wireless (complimentary), coffee/tea maker, non smoking rooms, in room safe, desk. The hotel offers various recreational opportunities. Hotel d'Orsay combines warm hospitality with a lovely ambiance to make your stay in Paris unforgettable.Hide

399 yd - Hotel Bac Saint-Germain

The Bac St. Germain Hotel is perfectly located for both business and leisure guests to Paris. All hotel's guestrooms have all the conveniences expected in a hotel in its class to suit guests' utmost cRead moreomforts. Modern comfort and convenience are seamlessly combined to ensure the guests' satisfaction. The hotel provides a warm and welcoming service of international standard. To make a reservation at the Bac St. Germain Hotel Paris with our secure online booking form, please choose your preffered period of stay.Hide

415 yd - Hôtel De Beaune

Hôtel De Beaune. The 2-star "Hôtel De Beaune" is a convenient base point for exploring Paris. This castle has 19 rooms. To add to your stay, there is a continental breakfast. For those who like to shaRead morere their experiences instantly, there is Internet access available free of charge.Hide

Customer reviews

More info

Musée d'Orsay, {CATEGORY}

Architects created one of the world's great museums from an old rail station, the neoclassical Gare d'Orsay, across the Seine from the Louvre and the Tuileries. Don't skip the Louvre, of course, but come here even if you have to miss all the other art museums in town. The Orsay boasts an astounding collection devoted to the watershed years 1848 to 1914, with a treasure trove by the big names plus all the lesser-known groups (the symbolists, pointillists, nabis, realists, and late romantics). The 80 galleries also include Belle Epoque furniture, photographs, objets d'art, and architectural models. A cinema shows classic films. A monument to the Industrial Revolution, the Orsay is covered by an arching glass roof allowing in floods of light. It displays works ranging from the creations of academic and historic painters such as Ingres to romanticists such as Delacroix, to neorealists including Courbet and Daumier. The Impressionists and post-Impressionists, including Manet, Monet, Cézanne, Van Gogh, and Renoir, share space with the fauves, Matisse, the cubists, and the expressionists in a setting once used by Orson Welles to film a nightmarish scene in The Trial, based on Kafka's unfinished novel. You'll find Millet's sunny wheat fields, Barbizon landscapes, Corot's mists, and Tahitian Gauguins all in the same hall. But it's the Impressionists who draw the crowds. When the nose-in-the-air Louvre chose not to display their works, a great rival was born. Led by Manet, Renoir, and Monet, the Impressionists shunned ecclesiastical and mythological set pieces for a light-bathed Seine, faint figures strolling in the Tuileries, pale-faced women in hazy bars, and even vulgar rail stations such as the Gare St-Lazare. And the Impressionists were the first to paint that most characteristic feature of Parisian life: the sidewalk cafe, especially in the artists' quarter of Montmartre. The most famous painting from this era is Manet's 1863 Déjeuner sur l'herbe (Picnic on the Grass), whose forest setting with a nude woman and two fully clothed men sent shock waves through respectable society when it was first exhibited. Two years later, Manet's Olympia created another scandal by depicting a woman lounging on her bed and wearing nothing but a flower in her hair and high-heeled shoes, she's attended by an African maid in the background. Zola called Manet "a man among eunuchs". One of Renoir's most joyous paintings is here: the Moulin de la Galette (1876). Degas is represented by his paintings of racehorses and dancers, his 1876 cafe scene, Absinthe, remains one of his most reproduced works. Paris-born Monet was fascinated by the effect of changing light on Rouen Cathédrale and brought its stone bubbles to life in a series of five paintings, our favorite is Rouen Cathédrale: Full Sunlight. Another celebrated work is by an American, Whistler's Arrangement in Grey and Black: Portrait of the Painter's Mother, better known as Whistler's Mother. It's said that this painting heralded modern art, though many critics denounced it at the time because of its funereal overtones. Whistler was content to claim he'd made "Mummy just as nice as possible".

Musée d'Orsay, {CATEGORY}

Architects created one of the world's great museums from an old rail station, the neoclassical Gare d'Orsay, across the Seine from the Louvre and the Tuileries. Don't skip the Louvre, of course, but come here even if you have to miss all the other art museums in town. The Orsay boasts an astounding collection devoted to the watershed years 1848 to 1914, with a treasure trove by the big names plus all the lesser-known groups (the symbolists, pointillists, nabis, realists, and late romantics). The 80 galleries also include Belle Epoque furniture, photographs, objets d'art, and architectural models. A cinema shows classic films. A monument to the Industrial Revolution, the Orsay is covered by an arching glass roof allowing in floods of light. It displays works ranging from the creations of academic and historic painters such as Ingres to romanticists such as Delacroix, to neorealists including Courbet and Daumier. The Impressionists and post-Impressionists, including Manet, Monet, Cézanne, Van Gogh, and Renoir, share space with the fauves, Matisse, the cubists, and the expressionists in a setting once used by Orson Welles to film a nightmarish scene in The Trial, based on Kafka's unfinished novel. You'll find Millet's sunny wheat fields, Barbizon landscapes, Corot's mists, and Tahitian Gauguins all in the same hall. But it's the Impressionists who draw the crowds. When the nose-in-the-air Louvre chose not to display their works, a great rival was born. Led by Manet, Renoir, and Monet, the Impressionists shunned ecclesiastical and mythological set pieces for a light-bathed Seine, faint figures strolling in the Tuileries, pale-faced women in hazy bars, and even vulgar rail stations such as the Gare St-Lazare. And the Impressionists were the first to paint that most characteristic feature of Parisian life: the sidewalk cafe, especially in the artists' quarter of Montmartre. The most famous painting from this era is Manet's 1863 Déjeuner sur l'herbe (Picnic on the Grass), whose forest setting with a nude woman and two fully clothed men sent shock waves through respectable society when it was first exhibited. Two years later, Manet's Olympia created another scandal by depicting a woman lounging on her bed and wearing nothing but a flower in her hair and high-heeled shoes, she's attended by an African maid in the background. Zola called Manet "a man among eunuchs". One of Renoir's most joyous paintings is here: the Moulin de la Galette (1876). Degas is represented by his paintings of racehorses and dancers, his 1876 cafe scene, Absinthe, remains one of his most reproduced works. Paris-born Monet was fascinated by the effect of changing light on Rouen Cathédrale and brought its stone bubbles to life in a series of five paintings, our favorite is Rouen Cathédrale: Full Sunlight. Another celebrated work is by an American, Whistler's Arrangement in Grey and Black: Portrait of the Painter's Mother, better known as Whistler's Mother. It's said that this painting heralded modern art, though many critics denounced it at the time because of its funereal overtones. Whistler was content to claim he'd made "Mummy just as nice as possible".

Musée d'Orsay, {CATEGORY}

Nearly 2.5 million visitors each year come to see the largest collection in the world of impressionist artwork, found in the splendid Musee d'Orsay. The building itself, called the Gare d'Orsay, was built for the World's Fair of 1900. During World War II, it was used to welcome freed prisoners. Once the train station (the Gare) fell into disuse and the adjacent hotel closed down in 1973, the building was threatened with demolition. However, it was decided to instead transform the building's function to house a collection of art from the second half of the 19th Century. It was inaugurated in 1986 under the governance of François Mitterand. The principal gallery of the ground floor, 138 meters long (453 feet) and 32 meters tall (105 feet), is a reminder of the building's history. Among the masterpieces in this gallery are the scandalous Enterrement à Ornans by Gustave Courbet and the Glaneuses by Jean-François Millet. Fans of impressionism should head directly up to the fifth floor, where works by the greatest masters of this genre are hung in galleries 29 to 48. In order of appearance, these include La Classe de danse by Degas, Still Lifes by Manet such as L'Asperge, Le Bal du Moulin de la Galette by Renoir, and La Gare Saint-Lazare, La Cathedrale de Rouen or the Nympheas by Claude Monet. Works by Van Gogh in gallery 35 and Cezanne in 36 follow, the small galleries 37 and 38 contain pastels by Degas, and galleries 43-44 are devoted to Gauguin's paintings of Tahiti. Decorative arts are located a few flights down, worth visiting notably for the impressive collection of Art Nouveau. While on this floor, don't miss the terrasse Rodin, where L'Homme qui marche is located, and worth taking the time to appreciate. For a short rest to help absorb this astonishing collection, visit! the Cafe des Hauteurs on the third floor or the restaurant on the sixth floor. Also don't forget to check out the beautiful Hotel Le BelleChasse , which is walking distance from here. -Aurelie Pichard.

Musée d'Orsay, {CATEGORY}

Nearly 2.5 million visitors each year come to see the largest collection in the world of impressionist artwork, found in the splendid Musee d'Orsay. The building itself, called the Gare d'Orsay, was built for the World's Fair of 1900. During World War II, it was used to welcome freed prisoners. Once the train station (the Gare) fell into disuse and the adjacent hotel closed down in 1973, the building was threatened with demolition. However, it was decided to instead transform the building's function to house a collection of art from the second half of the 19th Century. It was inaugurated in 1986 under the governance of François Mitterand. The principal gallery of the ground floor, 138 meters long (453 feet) and 32 meters tall (105 feet), is a reminder of the building's history. Among the masterpieces in this gallery are the scandalous Enterrement à Ornans by Gustave Courbet and the Glaneuses by Jean-François Millet. Fans of impressionism should head directly up to the fifth floor, where works by the greatest masters of this genre are hung in galleries 29 to 48. In order of appearance, these include La Classe de danse by Degas, Still Lifes by Manet such as L'Asperge, Le Bal du Moulin de la Galette by Renoir, and La Gare Saint-Lazare, La Cathedrale de Rouen or the Nympheas by Claude Monet. Works by Van Gogh in gallery 35 and Cezanne in 36 follow, the small galleries 37 and 38 contain pastels by Degas, and galleries 43-44 are devoted to Gauguin's paintings of Tahiti. Decorative arts are located a few flights down, worth visiting notably for the impressive collection of Art Nouveau. While on this floor, don't miss the terrasse Rodin, where L'Homme qui marche is located, and worth taking the time to appreciate. For a short rest to help absorb this astonishing collection, visit! the Cafe des Hauteurs on the third floor or the restaurant on the sixth floor. Also don't forget to check out the beautiful Hotel Le BelleChasse , which is walking distance from here. -Aurelie Pichard.

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> > > Musée d'Orsay hotels near museum: Musée d'Orsay, Paris Musée d'Orsay, Paris infos >

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