The hotel video guide for booking the best deals online - TVtrip

Forbidden City (People's Republic of China)

  • Overview
  • Map
  • Photos
loader
illustration

Forbidden City, {CATEGORY}

The Forbidden City, also known as the Palace Museum, was the imperial residence of the Ming (1368-1644) and Qing (1644-1911) Dynasties. The complex has 70 structures and more than 9000 rooms. It is surrounded by a 10 meter high wall dotted with elaborate watchtowers and encircled by a moat. Turned into a museum in the early 20th Century, it houses an extensive collection of fine treasures. The Nationalist Party took a large number of these treasures to Taiwan in 1949 but 900,000 priceless relics remain. Behind the palace is a delightful royal garden that is surprisingly quiet in contrast to the throngs of international visitors at Tiananmen Gate, the museum's official entrance. The Palace Museum that is commonly known as the Forbidden City is actually the inner core of the warren of buidlings and alleys, no longer standing, that made up the imperial Forbidden City that would have take up all the land now enclosed by the First Ring Road. Within the wall of the museum China's dynastic world was centered. The outer buidlings, now torn down, literally housed a city, its inhabitants' occupations made up exclusively by means to serve the emperor and the extensive royal family, including gold and silver smiths, butchers, seamstresses and imperial manufacturers. It is said that the design of the watchtowers that surround the outer walls of the moat were inspired by grasshopper cages. Do you see a resemblance?

Practical Information

Address: 4 Jingshan Qianjie, Beijing, 11 1000

City: Beijing

Country: China

Phone 1: +86 10 6513 2255

Email: dongcheng@bjta.gov.cn

Opening hours: 8:30am-4pm daily

Customer reviews

More info

Forbidden City, {CATEGORY}

The Forbidden City, also known as the Palace Museum, was the imperial residence of the Ming (1368-1644) and Qing (1644-1911) Dynasties. The complex has 70 structures and more than 9000 rooms. It is surrounded by a 10 meter high wall dotted with elaborate watchtowers and encircled by a moat. Turned into a museum in the early 20th Century, it houses an extensive collection of fine treasures. The Nationalist Party took a large number of these treasures to Taiwan in 1949 but 900,000 priceless relics remain. Behind the palace is a delightful royal garden that is surprisingly quiet in contrast to the throngs of international visitors at Tiananmen Gate, the museum's official entrance. The Palace Museum that is commonly known as the Forbidden City is actually the inner core of the warren of buidlings and alleys, no longer standing, that made up the imperial Forbidden City that would have take up all the land now enclosed by the First Ring Road. Within the wall of the museum China's dynastic world was centered. The outer buidlings, now torn down, literally housed a city, its inhabitants' occupations made up exclusively by means to serve the emperor and the extensive royal family, including gold and silver smiths, butchers, seamstresses and imperial manufacturers. It is said that the design of the watchtowers that surround the outer walls of the moat were inspired by grasshopper cages. Do you see a resemblance?

Forbidden City, {CATEGORY}

The Forbidden City, also known as the Palace Museum, was the imperial residence of the Ming (1368-1644) and Qing (1644-1911) Dynasties. The complex has 70 structures and more than 9000 rooms. It is surrounded by a 10 meter high wall dotted with elaborate watchtowers and encircled by a moat. Turned into a museum in the early 20th Century, it houses an extensive collection of fine treasures. The Nationalist Party took a large number of these treasures to Taiwan in 1949 but 900,000 priceless relics remain. Behind the palace is a delightful royal garden that is surprisingly quiet in contrast to the throngs of international visitors at Tiananmen Gate, the museum's official entrance. The Palace Museum that is commonly known as the Forbidden City is actually the inner core of the warren of buidlings and alleys, no longer standing, that made up the imperial Forbidden City that would have take up all the land now enclosed by the First Ring Road. Within the wall of the museum China's dynastic world was centered. The outer buidlings, now torn down, literally housed a city, its inhabitants' occupations made up exclusively by means to serve the emperor and the extensive royal family, including gold and silver smiths, butchers, seamstresses and imperial manufacturers. It is said that the design of the watchtowers that surround the outer walls of the moat were inspired by grasshopper cages. Do you see a resemblance?

International Sites

dansk | deutsch | ελληνικά | english | english | español | suomi | français | magyar | italiano | 日本語 | 한국어 | nederlands | norsk | polski | português | română | русский | српски | svenska | 中文 | 中文

International Sites

| | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | |

Why use TVtrip?

  • Best Rates

    Thanks to our booking partners you can access the rates on the web

  • Quality

    All videos are filmed by professionals

  • Maximum choice

    Choose over 35,884 video to help you make the right choice

  • Transparency

    Unbiased, professional videos to help you choose the right hotel

  • We speak your language

    TVtrip is currently in 22 languages

Informations

Terms of Use | Privacy Policy | About | Team | Press | Help | Contact Us

* Best min. prices over next 30 days and among our hotel booking partners.
The displayed amount is indicative and based on today’s exchange rate.

More info on filming your hotel?

© 2019 - TVtrip.com

Key